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Bettinger inside track boston

bettinger inside track boston

A meta-analysis of randomized experiments by Stanford University professor Eric Bettinger found a to percent increase in retention and graduation rates. each of the Boston Public Schools classes of , , and About Abt Associates. Founded in Cambridge, Massachusetts in , Abt provides. previously Senior Vice President of Jobs for the Future in Boston. Inside Track Trainer, PROSCI Change Management Practitioner. VALUE INVESTING RESOURCE BLOGSPOT

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Bettinger Stanford University Abstract College graduation rates often lag behind college attendance rates. One theory as to why students do not complete college is that they lack key information about how to be successful or fail to act on the information that they have. We present evidence from a randomized experiment which tests the effectiveness of individualized student coaching.

Over the course of two separate school years, InsideTrack, a student coaching service, provided coaching to students attending public, private, and proprietary universities. Most of the participating students were nontraditional college students enrolled in degree programs. Fee: We used to put our hate mail on the wall. Raposa: I lost count how many times we had to make up with Mark Wahlberg.

He would say, Tell the girls to cut the shit. Fee: I had to hug it out with him at some MTV party at some convention. Raposa: God bless the Kennedys, though. No matter what we wrote about them, they took it and always said hello, wrote us little notes when we said something nice. They knew how to work the media. Fee: I went to St. John on vacation, and I was at the Skinny Legs, just chatting with the people.

Where are you from? Well, your senator, Ted, was just here. He apparently chartered a boat and the motor conked out. The harbor was jam-packed with boats, so he was going to sail out. He ends up catching the mooring line and all the boats start smashing into each other. And he ran around and handed out money.

So I call the PR guy. What now? I was on vacation last week in St. Oh no. Convey: I think that on the whole, at their height, much of the town loved the Track Gals, and the rest of the town had a grudging regard because frankly nobody else was doing what they were doing, and the column was almost always fun to read. Patrick Lyons, owner of the Lyons Group: I paid publicists to keep my name out of the paper. But then, probably in the early s, I literally worked overtime to stay out.

If you think about the greatest creature on Earth, the great whale, it only gets harpooned when it comes up. A lot of people get a buzz out of seeing their name in the paper, but I definitely did not. Rose: I literally would sit outside the Herald for the early edition to come out on my way home.

You could not rest or go to sleep until you knew which way your client was spun by them. Barclay: Everybody was modest when they got in there, but they tried. At the same time, the Track Gals were scary because they would call me occasionally and ask me questions about people who had been in the Rack. That was one of my quintessential Inside Track moments when they blew up my phone all night. Eventually all of those emails ended up in our inbox. So we wrote all about that.

I was quoted saying it was like a favor bank, and they kept score. I can still hear Gayle: So what are you going to give me if I keep this out? That was your penalty. The Track Gals in their glory days, they were like Vegas, the house always wins. The Track Gals always won in the dialogue about how you were going to shape an article. They always got the last word. Fee: I have to tell the story about how we fixed up Tom and Gisele.

It was always some big fat guy with face paint. So they called and asked if we wanted to interview Gisele. And we were like, eh, sure. So I ask her, what do you think of Tom Brady? Of course I put it in the paper. So, who fixed them up? Us, obviously! Ernie Boch Jr. It seems almost inconceivable the power the column had. Whether the Track Gals were good for you or bad for you, they raised your profile. They were in control. The answer: invest and evolve, or die. Convey: The Globe tried to respond in several different ways to the Inside Track through the years.

The first one was some dumb beans and cod column where they tried to do gossip, but they did it like they were holding an objectionable object out in two fingers with their pinkies raised. They thought it was beneath them. Raposa: Back then it was easier to engage people by phone—you knew if it was real or not. Nobody talks to each other anymore; everyone emails.

Fee: On the phone, you could put them at ease instead of emails going back and forth. Raposa: Joe Kennedy and his annulment, that actually came from snail mail. Fee: The Internet was hard for us. Raposa: Before that if someone got a pic of a celebrity they would give it to us, and we would print it and put their name on it.

Now they just throw it up there. Fee: Remember when Drew Bledsoe did that swan dive into the mosh pit at the Paradise? That was pre-Internet and people sent us all of their pics of him looking so hammered. Now that would be on Instagram in 10 seconds. And then picked up by TMZ. And they would pay. The other thing is all these Inside Track offshoots, like Barstool Sports.

Fee: Nobody did sports gossip besides us, and then Barstool Sports came and they kind of cornered the market because they could get away with so much. They could put stuff in there without being verified or vetted. We were journalists and followed responsible journalistic rules, and none of those people did. Fee: The Herald lost a couple of libel suits. We never did. And we won. Megan Johnson, Inside Track assistant: Tom Scholz, from the band Boston, sued the Track claiming that they said he was responsible for the suicide of the lead singer, Brad Delp.

Convey: The story happened under my watch. I read that story before it went into the paper, and I completely stood behind it then and stand behind it now. It went all the way to the Supreme Court and we won. But it probably cost the paper 5 or 6 million bucks—a paper that did not have those kinds of resources to spend. It became clear that if you got sued, it was as good as losing.

Even if you won it would cost you so much that it would be a mortal wound. You could see the mentality of, why are we going to risk getting sued over a gossip column? I can understand that point of view, but I will say that as the Inside Track faded from view, the Boston journalism scene got a whole lot less interesting. And a whole lot less fun. I think in some ways you might be able to chart the rise and fall of gossip with the rise and fall of newspapers.

Johnson: The relationships between management and the Inside Track really started to fall apart. The lawsuit affected what we were allowed to write and say tremendously—constantly afraid of lawsuits, everything gone over with a fine-toothed comb in a ridiculous way. She was dating Conor Kennedy, who was a junior in high school at the time. We finally nailed it down that she got thrown out. I called Vicki [Kennedy] and she confirmed it. Our editors did not put it on the front page. Raposa: Chickenshit.

Johnson: Taylor Swift crashing the Kennedy wedding was a tremendous story for us; it went national, bigger than I had ever seen. We were absolutely killing it. But we were always in trouble. Everything was a battle. The Inside Track and sports sold the damn paper—they were so clueless about that, they chopped down the column from two pages to one.

It was so dumb. They were killing really good stories, repeatedly, because they were afraid of lawsuits. Fee: You know what was a good story, my last good story for the Track? We got pics. That story went global. Fee continued the column on her own until she retired several years later. Reporter Olivia Vanni took over the revamped column until it was permanently shelved in during the pandemic.

Nothing has replaced it. When Laura left in , I did it all by myself until For no more money. Whoever was in charge at the time believed we were replaceable. They hired, what was her name, Olivia something or other. Who had about 27 seconds of experience. There was definitely a little bit of imposter syndrome.

We wanted to switch it over from a gossip column to something that was more anchored in news and journalism. I was 26 when I started the Track; it was extremely intimidating. People kept saying, Oh, you have such big shoes to fill. It was hard, especially for a young journalist, being compared constantly to these people.

It was really intimidating for me because I had to play by the rules a little bit more, not get us into lawsuits. That was a big part of it. I would have loved to do some of the stuff that they did, but the Herald was very much gun-shy. It was a lighter column, more geared to press releases. Vanni: It was hard. People got used to what the Inside Track was. Convey: Boston certainly is poorer without it. First the Herald was limping and then it was struggling and then it was on its knees and then finally it fell flat on its face, and in a certain way the column was collateral damage.

Newspapers everywhere were cutting away what was perceived as nonessential. But truthfully, gossip was one of the five major food groups. It was a symptom of an underlying disease when they whacked the Inside Track.

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Oh no. Convey: I think that on the whole, at their height, much of the town loved the Track Gals, and the rest of the town had a grudging regard because frankly nobody else was doing what they were doing, and the column was almost always fun to read. Patrick Lyons, owner of the Lyons Group: I paid publicists to keep my name out of the paper. But then, probably in the early s, I literally worked overtime to stay out. If you think about the greatest creature on Earth, the great whale, it only gets harpooned when it comes up.

A lot of people get a buzz out of seeing their name in the paper, but I definitely did not. Rose: I literally would sit outside the Herald for the early edition to come out on my way home. You could not rest or go to sleep until you knew which way your client was spun by them. Barclay: Everybody was modest when they got in there, but they tried.

At the same time, the Track Gals were scary because they would call me occasionally and ask me questions about people who had been in the Rack. That was one of my quintessential Inside Track moments when they blew up my phone all night.

Eventually all of those emails ended up in our inbox. So we wrote all about that. I was quoted saying it was like a favor bank, and they kept score. I can still hear Gayle: So what are you going to give me if I keep this out? That was your penalty. The Track Gals in their glory days, they were like Vegas, the house always wins. The Track Gals always won in the dialogue about how you were going to shape an article.

They always got the last word. Fee: I have to tell the story about how we fixed up Tom and Gisele. It was always some big fat guy with face paint. So they called and asked if we wanted to interview Gisele. And we were like, eh, sure. So I ask her, what do you think of Tom Brady? Of course I put it in the paper. So, who fixed them up? Us, obviously! Ernie Boch Jr. It seems almost inconceivable the power the column had. Whether the Track Gals were good for you or bad for you, they raised your profile.

They were in control. The answer: invest and evolve, or die. Convey: The Globe tried to respond in several different ways to the Inside Track through the years. The first one was some dumb beans and cod column where they tried to do gossip, but they did it like they were holding an objectionable object out in two fingers with their pinkies raised.

They thought it was beneath them. Raposa: Back then it was easier to engage people by phone—you knew if it was real or not. Nobody talks to each other anymore; everyone emails. Fee: On the phone, you could put them at ease instead of emails going back and forth. Raposa: Joe Kennedy and his annulment, that actually came from snail mail.

Fee: The Internet was hard for us. Raposa: Before that if someone got a pic of a celebrity they would give it to us, and we would print it and put their name on it. Now they just throw it up there. Fee: Remember when Drew Bledsoe did that swan dive into the mosh pit at the Paradise? That was pre-Internet and people sent us all of their pics of him looking so hammered.

Now that would be on Instagram in 10 seconds. And then picked up by TMZ. And they would pay. The other thing is all these Inside Track offshoots, like Barstool Sports. Fee: Nobody did sports gossip besides us, and then Barstool Sports came and they kind of cornered the market because they could get away with so much.

They could put stuff in there without being verified or vetted. We were journalists and followed responsible journalistic rules, and none of those people did. Fee: The Herald lost a couple of libel suits. We never did. And we won. Megan Johnson, Inside Track assistant: Tom Scholz, from the band Boston, sued the Track claiming that they said he was responsible for the suicide of the lead singer, Brad Delp.

Convey: The story happened under my watch. I read that story before it went into the paper, and I completely stood behind it then and stand behind it now. It went all the way to the Supreme Court and we won. But it probably cost the paper 5 or 6 million bucks—a paper that did not have those kinds of resources to spend. It became clear that if you got sued, it was as good as losing. Even if you won it would cost you so much that it would be a mortal wound.

You could see the mentality of, why are we going to risk getting sued over a gossip column? I can understand that point of view, but I will say that as the Inside Track faded from view, the Boston journalism scene got a whole lot less interesting. And a whole lot less fun.

I think in some ways you might be able to chart the rise and fall of gossip with the rise and fall of newspapers. Johnson: The relationships between management and the Inside Track really started to fall apart. The lawsuit affected what we were allowed to write and say tremendously—constantly afraid of lawsuits, everything gone over with a fine-toothed comb in a ridiculous way. She was dating Conor Kennedy, who was a junior in high school at the time.

We finally nailed it down that she got thrown out. I called Vicki [Kennedy] and she confirmed it. Our editors did not put it on the front page. Raposa: Chickenshit. Johnson: Taylor Swift crashing the Kennedy wedding was a tremendous story for us; it went national, bigger than I had ever seen. We were absolutely killing it. But we were always in trouble. Everything was a battle. The Inside Track and sports sold the damn paper—they were so clueless about that, they chopped down the column from two pages to one.

It was so dumb. They were killing really good stories, repeatedly, because they were afraid of lawsuits. Fee: You know what was a good story, my last good story for the Track? We got pics. That story went global. Fee continued the column on her own until she retired several years later. Reporter Olivia Vanni took over the revamped column until it was permanently shelved in during the pandemic. Nothing has replaced it. When Laura left in , I did it all by myself until For no more money. Whoever was in charge at the time believed we were replaceable.

They hired, what was her name, Olivia something or other. Who had about 27 seconds of experience. There was definitely a little bit of imposter syndrome. We wanted to switch it over from a gossip column to something that was more anchored in news and journalism. I was 26 when I started the Track; it was extremely intimidating. People kept saying, Oh, you have such big shoes to fill. It was hard, especially for a young journalist, being compared constantly to these people.

It was really intimidating for me because I had to play by the rules a little bit more, not get us into lawsuits. That was a big part of it. I would have loved to do some of the stuff that they did, but the Herald was very much gun-shy. It was a lighter column, more geared to press releases. Vanni: It was hard. People got used to what the Inside Track was.

Convey: Boston certainly is poorer without it. First the Herald was limping and then it was struggling and then it was on its knees and then finally it fell flat on its face, and in a certain way the column was collateral damage. Newspapers everywhere were cutting away what was perceived as nonessential. But truthfully, gossip was one of the five major food groups.

It was a symptom of an underlying disease when they whacked the Inside Track. Boch Jr. But they had this crazy power, matched with legitimacy, matched with a daily dose. It was nuts. The Inside Track had its moment and had its day. And nobody really reports on it now. Wake up and smell the java. There are new, young, smart people that are jockeying for a position right now, and they deserve notice.

The Storybook Ball will be back and somebody will secure a walk-on to a Mark Wahlberg movie for his wife, and guess what, people want to know about that. Fee: I live on the Cape and then I go to Florida in the winter. So basically I do nothing but go to the beach and play golf and play with my grandson. I was sitting on the beach in Florida when Bob Kraft got arrested and my phone was ringing off the hook with people saying, You have to come back!

Raposa: That was one of maybe three times I thought to myself, Ahh, this is so good I wish I could go back! Gayle and I were going back and forth, texting, texting, texting. Fee: People still think we are their personal gossip column. Sitting here laughing about it now, yeah, I miss it. But it would not be the same now as it was then. Who would we write for? Rose: I think Boston now is the Wild West—anybody can do anything and get away with it without any repercussions.

Over the course of two separate school years, InsideTrack, a student coaching service, provided coaching to students attending public, private, and proprietary universities. Most of the participating students were nontraditional college students enrolled in degree programs. The participating universities and InsideTrack randomly assigned students to be coached.

The coach contacted students regularly to develop a clear vision of their goals, to guide them in connecting their daily activities to their long-term goals, and to support them in building skills, including time management, self-advocacy, and study skills. Students who were randomly assigned to a coach were more likely to persist during the treatment period and were more likely to be attending the university 1 year after the coaching had ended.

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